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View Full Version : Ford sells 27,000 RHD Mustangs in first 12 months.



jpd80
6th September 2016, 03:25 PM
I saw this on an autonews.com report (requires subscription)


Mustang conquers the world
A globetrotting hit, from Europe to Mideast to Australia
September 5, 2016 @ 12:01 am
Nick Bunkley Link to report..... (http://www.autonews.com/article/20160905/OEM/309059955/mustang-conquers-the-world)

Customers in England and Australia face backlogs of at least six months for a new Ford Mustang. In Germany, the Mustang has attracted more retail buyers this year than the home-country favorites Audi TT and Porsche 911.

And in the U.S., the Mustang is not just beating, but downright pummeling, the redesigned Chevrolet Camaro en route to a second consecutive title as the nation's top-selling sports car.

Ford Motor Co.'s 2014 overhaul of the Mustang, which included opening sales in 81 more countries to turn it into a global halo for the automaker, is paying off. Demand has been especially heavy for the first-ever right-hand-drive Mustang, which went on sale late last year in 25 markets where the car had been virtually off-limits previously.

Ford said it has sold about 27,000 right-hand- drive Mustangs since production started a year ago.



"We are always trying to eke out one more right-hand-drive unit if we can."
Carl Widmann
Ford Mustang chief engineer

"Mustang has been a huge success for us," Colin Massey, general sales manager at Jennings Ford Middlesbrough in northeastern England, said in an email. "We are still seeing a steady demand for the Mustang and are currently averaging between three and four orders per week."

Ford has a backlog of seven months for the Mustang with a four-cylinder EcoBoost engine and nine months for the V-8 version, Massey said. The wait has been up to 10 months in Australia, where the Mustang is now Ford's second-biggest seller, behind the Ranger pickup.

"We are always trying to eke out one more right-hand-drive unit if we can," said Carl Widmann, the Mustang's chief engineer. "We've exceeded expectations overall. We're getting happy customers across a lot of different regions."

Ford has sold more than 20,000 Mustangs in Europe, including about 4,400 in the United Kingdom and nearly 6,000 in Germany, since shipments there began nearly a year ago. Ford said it's the most popular car in the U.K. that's rated at more than 250 hp. The Mustang is the top-selling sports car this year in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and South Africa as well, Ford said.

HSE2
6th September 2016, 03:54 PM
This is a brilliant result, one that should hopefully put other Ford product on the RHD agenda.

jpd80
6th September 2016, 04:36 PM
This is a brilliant result, one that should hopefully put other Ford product on the RHD agenda.
Absolutely.
I hope it gives Ford real reasons to think more confidently about special projects
for what appears to be valuable niche markets - I'm preaching to the choir here.;)

There are 25 RHD markets out there and of that 27K Mustang sales, only 4,400 are UK
and 3,300 are Australia, nearly 20,000 sales came from the other 23 RHD markets.
So there's definitely justification for more effort on the Mustang's side to explore the depth
of those markets....

Is there any way possible that Ford could catch fire in a bottle with a mid sized RWD sedan......

dash gt
6th September 2016, 05:05 PM
With things like EPS etc it should be much easier to make vehicles global spec.

Ford needs to look into bringing another heavy truck into our market... F150 or F250 or both! I would buy one tomorrow!

Elks
7th September 2016, 08:47 PM
F150/250 is not a heavy truck. They are a pick-up truck.

A heavy truck is a T359 and bigger

Franco Cozzo
8th September 2016, 01:16 PM
With things like EPS etc it should be much easier to make vehicles global spec.

Ford needs to look into bringing another heavy truck into our market... F150 or F250 or both! I would buy one tomorrow!

I'd be keen on a 2.7L Ecoboost F150

jpd80
11th September 2016, 07:12 PM
Have heard from my contact who was working at Flat Rock that Ford has the plant on two shifts
but doesn't want to go to three now that sales are softening in the US. Apparently they are running
a fine line to fill exports and keep US inventory at acceptable limits while building Continental.

Which is a bit disappointing to all those waiting months and months, I wonder what would happen
to sales strength if Ford could eventually shorten delivery time to three months or less and get a few
examples at the dealers......perhaps that is the plan a little ways down the track.......

phillyc
11th September 2016, 09:18 PM
Have heard from my contact who was working at Flat Rock that Ford has the plant on two shifts
but doesn't want to go to three now that sales are softening in the US. Apparently they are running
a fine line to fill exports and keep US inventory at acceptable limits while building Continental.
Coupe sales typically have half lifes with sales tapering off from launch to refresh.
I completely understand why Ford will keep to two shifts.


Which is a bit disappointing to all those waiting months and months, I wonder what would happen
to sales strength if Ford could eventually shorten delivery time to three months or less and get a few
examples at the dealers......perhaps that is the plan a little ways down the track.......
I think that plan would help maintain sales.

Certainly I'm seeing plenty around, but they do stick out in traffic!

FTe217
11th September 2016, 09:25 PM
They sure do stand out in the traffic !

13726548
11th September 2016, 11:41 PM
I see plenty... Red / yellow and Black


They do nothing for me at least ?

FTe217
12th September 2016, 01:05 PM
yer thats cool, we all have our likes dislikes in models and shapes.
I think it looks great from the rear 3/4 angle, the rear is nice and wide.

jpd80
12th September 2016, 05:43 PM
Coupe sales typically have half lifes with sales tapering off from launch to refresh.
I completely understand why Ford will keep to two shifts.


I think that plan would help maintain sales.

Certainly I'm seeing plenty around, but they do stick out in traffic!

I have a hunch that by the time all current orders are delivered, we may well be into the
facelift, possibly more engine upgrades and most likely a 10-speed auto option.

Regular refreshes that ford Aust could never afford will now be at Ford NA's discretion
and hopefully timed with interesting special models designed to keep the love coming.

The FWD Commodore may see a few more RWD tragics jump ship until GM comes to its senses.

defective
16th July 2017, 07:59 PM
Was at all ford day today at Willowbank, absolutely gobsmacked by how many new mustangs were there. Was more like all mustang day.
And I didn't see two the same, seemed everyone was customised in some way.

Gawd I want one lol.

4Vman
16th July 2017, 08:04 PM
I see them everywhere now.

There are 1441 FM Mustangs forsale on carsales, 1207 of which are either brand new or demo....

There is plenty of stock here now with apparently another 5000 MY17's yet to come.

dash gt
17th July 2017, 01:35 PM
I have a hunch that by the time all current orders are delivered, we may well be into the
facelift, possibly more engine upgrades and most likely a 10-speed auto option.

Regular refreshes that ford Aust could never afford will now be at Ford NA's discretion
and hopefully timed with interesting special models designed to keep the love coming.

The FWD Commodore may see a few more RWD tragics jump ship until GM comes to its senses.

Current orders haven pretty much been caught up.

Dealers now have an abundance of stock with more on the way to be stored by Ford themselves for the change over gap between MY17 and MY18 here.

I think MY18 will make a great car even better, especially with respect to technology, something the current ones were lacking thanks to ours getting decontented.

WASP
17th July 2017, 02:52 PM
That's the thing Dash. I suspect that the MY18 will really date the model it replace and market will be flooded with used stock driving the value down in the short to medium term.
Of course, you would expect that with any superseded model but the MY18 just has more of everything to make it quite a formidable package.

One thing the current 2016-17 model has going for it is the looks. It looks more muscular and sculptured than the MY18 from the footage shown and should age really well. In years to come I think it will remain a very desirable Mustang model due to its looks, tuning ability and the abundance of performance and cosmetic add on available. I think if you are intending to hang on your Mustang for while then the availability of the MY17 models, or used 16-17 versions represent a great opportunity. If you are looking to flip your Mustang in the short to medium term you might be better off waiting for MY18.

dash gt
18th July 2017, 02:01 PM
Yeh at first i preferred the MY17 look, but like most things the MY18 has grown on me.

Even new drive away prices have dropped up to 10k from the early days now that demand has dropped.

Some dealers are advertising 4 cylinders for 46k drive away which is pretty good value for anyone trying to get into a 2 door sports car.

If i get one it will look like this:

http://static1.preparadopravaler.com.br/articles/5/19/65/5/@/108250-ford-mustang-foi-apresentado-oficialment-660x0-1.jpg

defective
18th July 2017, 05:13 PM
Why has fords design gone to the point where the looks have to grow on you?

Other then the gt, what model is really just a damn good looking car?

4Vman
18th September 2017, 05:54 PM
http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/technology/why-it-took-50-years-for-the-ford-mustang-to-become-an-overnight-success-in-australia/news-story/6794f5b846829e1e7975b5945cad4815



Why it took 50 years for the Ford Mustang to become an overnight success in Australia

Joshua Dowling, National Motoring Editor, News Corp Australia Network
September 15, 2017 10:00pm



WHEN the iconic Mustang muscle car went on sale in Australia in late 2015, Ford thought it might sell 1000 a year.

Imagine Ford’s surprise when it took 4000 orders in the first few months. Even jacking up the price didn’t put a dent on demand.

This year Ford is on track to sell almost 10,000 Mustangs — a staggering 10 times more than what it originally forecast.

The Mustang has become a sales sensation Down Under as Aussie Ford fans fill the gap left by the much loved local hero, the Falcon, which went out of production last October when Ford closed its factory doors after 91 years.


Sales of the Mustang have even exceeded Ford’s expectations.

The Mustang waiting list initially stretched beyond 12 months.

The Ford factory in Michigan couldn’t produce more Mustangs for Australia overnight because there are 104 individual parts unique to right-hand-drive versions sold in Australia.

Ford had to contact the suppliers of those 104 parts and dramatically increase the order for right-hand-drive parts, which took months to ramp up.

Fast forward to today and there are healthy supplies of Mustang in Australia.

The Mustang has just notched up its 20th month in a row as Australia’s top selling sports car.

So far this year the Mustang has sewn up 50 per cent of the sports car market locally; 18 other models such as the Toyota 86 coupe and Mazda MX-5 convertible fight over the remaining 50 per cent.

So why is an impractical two-door coupe powered by a thirsty V8 in such hot demand? Sports car sales usually start strong and then hit the brakes.

The Mustang has done the opposite because Australia was ripe for it.

The average age of new-car buyers is 51 years, and people in that bracket grew up watching Mustangs on TV shows and in movies, such as Steve McQueen’s 1968 hit, Bullitt.


Mustang buyers are also at an age when they’re coming into money or have put a dent on their mortgage, and have a bit of cash to treat themselves.

The other contributing factor: the end of local production of the Ford Falcon and its V8 derivatives.

When the Mustang was confirmed for Australia, Ford was adamant it was not a replacement for the Falcon. But it turns out that’s exactly what has happened.

The Ford Mondeo sedan and wagon from Europe have technically filled the void left by Falcon. But their sales are modest compared to Falcon in its glory days because buyers have shifted to small cars, SUVs and utes.

Ford, despite spending millions of dollars over the past three years trying to soften its image to focus on women and technology, the very blokey Mustang is now the second biggest selling Ford locally — after the very blokey Ranger ute (which accounts for more than half of all Ford sales locally so far this year).

Mustang sales are now higher than the Falcon’s were in its final years.


The cover of the 1965 Ford Mustang brochure. Picture: Supplied.
The four cylinder coupe can be had for $50,000 drive-away, the V8 coupe manual $60,000 and the V8 auto convertible tops out at about $70,000.

And while the price point hasn’t come down much, dealers are being less greedy with their margin because there is now plenty of stock available, so they aren’t able to hold customers to ransom any more.

But you could probably negotiate a couple of grand off this with some haggling IF a dealer is caught with one and wants to let it go.

There’s one other prediction Ford got wrong: demand for V8s.

In case you missed it, the new Mustang is also available with a four-cylinder engine.

Some might call it sacrilege but Ford calls it smart planning, given the uncertainty around petrol prices and the possibility of stricter emissions standards in future. The four-cylinder also happens to be nice to drive, if a little quiet.

When the Mustang launched locally two years ago Ford forecast four-cylinder Mustangs would eventually account for more than 50 per cent of sales.

So far fewer than 10 per cent of Mustangs sold in Australia are the four-cylinder variety, and even then that’s only because they’ve been forced into the dealer network — or bought by people who wanted to jump the queue for a V8.

Ingeniously, the only way to distinguish the V8 from the four-cylinder Mustang is a badge on each front fender. Both have the same large exhaust pipes, but only one car makes the right noise.


The ‘5.0’ badges on the front fenders are the only giveaway it’s a V8. Picture: Supplied.
Why did it take so long for the Mustang to arrive, even after countless letters over the decades from Ford fanatics in Australia to head office in Detroit?

Despite the Mustang’s popularity here, it only represents about 5 per cent of global production — but it costs just as much to engineer a right-hand-drive version as it does a left-hand-drive.

It’s difficult to recoup development costs from such small right-hand-drive volumes.

For decades the Mustang kept getting pushed down the list of priorities until someone at Ford realised it was the company’s only car with global recognition. There are more Mustang car clubs outside the US than inside its borders.

Ford finally decided to take a hit on development costs and build a Mustang for the world. This is the first time in the Mustang’s history Ford has built its iconic muscle car in right-hand-drive on a US production line. Earlier models imported in the 1960s and early 2000s were converted locally.


More than 90 per cent of Mustangs sold locally are the V8; the remaining 10 per cent is the four-cylinder version. Picture: Supplied.
So far, the right-hand-drive gamble has paid dividends. Which is why the Mustang chief engineer, Carl Widmann, was sent to Australia from Detroit soon after the Mustang launched locally — to talk to owners and find out what the fuss was all about.

After a long line of Mustang owners took turns to poke him the chest — figuratively speaking — it’s fair to say he now regards Australia as the biggest market for Mustang globally, after the US and ahead of Europe.

“The interest in this market has really surprised us … and we need to understand it better,” Widmann said at the time. “Australian customers are very passionate, they really love their cars. Australia certainly has our attention now.”

jpd80
22nd September 2017, 07:02 PM
Sorry, just saw this,


Despite the Mustang’s popularity here, it only represents about 5 per cent of global production — but it costs just as much to engineer a right-hand-drive version as it does a left-hand-drive.
I find it amazing that misconceptions of actual development costs and production volume seem to be missed
on our press, our market is one of several RHD markets that when grouped together, justifies the effort.

The premium price paid for factory RHD Mustangs is well worth it to Ford when all the builds are batched
for Euro based or aligned markets. The cost of development is not that bad when most of the engneering
is done as part of the original project. Sure there are some RHD differences but most of those are done
in virtual reality and crash tested over and over long beofer actual cars are built.


So far, the right-hand-drive gamble has paid dividends. Which is why the Mustang chief engineer, Carl Widmann, was sent to Australia from Detroit soon after the Mustang launched locally — to talk to owners and find out what the fuss was all about.
It was really a toe in the water stuff fo Ford because they had been fed a regular diet of Falcon sorrow
that they couldn't gauge real buyer interest, and now they act so shocked...please they knew it would sell.

4Vman
22nd September 2017, 11:37 PM
Sorry, just saw this,


I find it amazing that misconceptions of actual development costs and production volume seem to be missed
on our press, our market is one of several RHD markets that when grouped together, justifies the effort.

The premium price paid for factory RHD Mustangs is well worth it to Ford when all the builds are batched
for Euro based or aligned markets. The cost of development is not that bad when most of the engneering
is done as part of the original project. Sure there are some RHD differences but most of those are done
in virtual reality and crash tested over and over long beofer actual cars are built.


It was really a toe in the water stuff fo Ford because they had been fed a regular diet of Falcon sorrow
that they couldn't gauge real buyer interest, and now they act so shocked...please they knew it would sell.

If you're serious about being a global player with a truly global footprint you don't penalize different markets dis-proportionally.

You look at your developments costs as a collective total and amortize that across every unit you produce.

Otherwise you're constantly tying one hand behind your back in smaller markets.

jpd80
23rd September 2017, 03:02 PM
If you're serious about being a global player with a truly global footprint you don't penalize different markets dis-proportionally.

You look at your developments costs as a collective total and amortize that across every unit you produce.

Otherwise you're constantly tying one hand behind your back in smaller markets.

I'm still shocked that Ford cannot see market potential for a TTV6 AWD Fusion/Mondeo.....

They are happy to knock out 250-300/mth of uninspiring, anonymous Mondeo sales and not
consider a vehicle that may turn it into something with a cult following...maybe, the new XR6T?
Sure, the power isn't there with the 2.7 but the Lincoln 3.0 TTV6 with 300 Kw is getting up there..

If Australia and UK can show positive interest in performance models then, that moves the needle towards
taking more chances with performance variants that stand a good prospects of premium sales......

Colour me overly optimistic but it's up to Ford to take a chance and offer buyers something interesting,
if you're perpetually afraid of failure then, that stops them seeking out those valuable niches and making
the impossible possible.....Mustang was the template, now do the same with a FWD/AWD TTV6 sedan.

I'll stop now.....

flappist
23rd September 2017, 03:53 PM
You means make a car for a market that was so good that they stopped building them?

While it may sell a few look at the absolute vitriol on the falcon/commodore social media against anything that is not RWD/V8/4 door.

Do you really need to be reminded of any of the anti turbo 6 rhetoric that has been spewing for the last 15 years?

How about the apoplectic fits over FRONT WHEEL DRIVE which is what the Fusion Sport is for the majority of its operation with the AWD only being enabled when the vehicle's computer decides it is needed?

I am quite sure the product people at Ford read a lot of the bullshit posted on social media sites and based on what I have read over the last few years I certainly would not gamble on a bespoke RHD Fusion Sport.

I suspect we only got the Mustang because of the impending termination of the Falcon and Commodore.
Here is a question. Should there be a TT ecoboost V6 Mustang that is quicker, cheaper and handles better than the V8?
The reaction to this question is, I believe, the answer to yours.....

HSE2
23rd September 2017, 04:27 PM
. Should there be a TT ecoboost V6 Mustang that is quicker, cheaper and handles better than the V8?


Yep but wasn't this question answered in the Ford GT. Well its not cheap and you had to be acceptable as a owner. If you ignore that part the highest ranking Ford product is a TT V6 in the highest ranking brand or name. Ford GT.


All that aside Kia has reported that most interest in stinger isn't coming form Ford or Holden but form European. It appears we are special kind of bogan. Splash of snobbery mixed in.

flappist
23rd September 2017, 04:46 PM
Yep but wasn't this question answered in the Ford GT. Well its not cheap and you had to be acceptable as a owner. If you ignore that part the highest ranking Ford product is a TT V6 in the highest ranking brand or name. Ford GT.


All that aside Kia has reported that most interest in stinger isn't coming form Ford or Holden but form European. It appears we are special kind of bogan. Splash of snobbery mixed in.

Well Ford GT is not available here so really it is not that relevant. Also "real" GTs are just fast, the number of cylinders is secondary. Look at all the Porsches etc.

I remember HSV wanking on how their competition was euros. I did not believe them either.....

4Vman
23rd September 2017, 04:56 PM
Whats the sales split here For Mustang by power plant again?

HSE2
23rd September 2017, 05:12 PM
Well Ford GT is not available here so really it is not that relevant. Also "real" GTs are just fast, the number of cylinders is secondary. Look at all the Porsches etc.

I remember HSV wanking on how their competition was euros. I did not believe them either.....

What do you mean it’s not available here. Australia has two.

RedMustang
28th September 2017, 07:15 AM
Hopefully they use this as an opportunity to improve the interior. Don't get me wrong, its good, but it has a lot of room for improvement.

Elks
28th September 2017, 03:59 PM
Sorry, just saw this,


Despite the Mustang’s popularity here, it only represents about 5 per cent of global production — but it costs just as much to engineer a right-hand-drive version as it does a left-hand-drive.

I find it amazing that misconceptions of actual development costs and production volume seem to be missed
on our press, our market is one of several RHD markets that when grouped together, justifies the effort.

Factually incorrect.

To engineer a whole car is a massive exercise. where everything from how the boot lid locks to wheel design to engine layout. To make a RHD version of that same car doesnt require a clean sheet.

4Vman
28th September 2017, 05:08 PM
Factually incorrect.

To engineer a whole car is a massive exercise. where everything from how the boot lid locks to wheel design to engine layout. To make a RHD version of that same car doesnt require a clean sheet.

Agree.

The extra cost is nothing remotely close to the original, and a cost that should be shared across all units.

WASP
28th September 2017, 06:40 PM
Hopefully they use this as an opportunity to improve the interior. Don't get me wrong, its good, but it has a lot of room for improvement.

I would have to agree there. The plastics used and some of the bright work quality does detract from the overall finish of the car. Also, things like the handbrake position and not having an automated system for moving the front seats to allow rear passengers to enter/exit with ease was a surprise given the rest of the tech on offer.